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#1 Colloquium

Media Industries in Global Frames: Craft, Collaboration, and Competition

2018

May 3-4

Media Industries in Global Frames: Craft, Collaboration, and Competition is an international colloquium organised by Centre for Cinema Studies (CCS) in launching a new research cluster hosted by the CCS. Media industries research has over the years blossomed, and become a vibrant undertaking, in scope, productivity and complexity. In this event we want to find common pathways, examples that help to focus scholarly effort that is becoming unwieldy, and not easily wrapped up in handy packages for transmission. Hence the 3Cs, craft, collaboration and competition. All of these words have reach into the range of media industry production, and circulation, research.

Craft, collaboration and competition are loaded terms, dependent on contexts for meaning, and connotations. All three have radically labile senses (i.e., prone to change) indicating positive and negative, exemplary and reprehensible activities. All three are Janus faced.

Competition, collaboration, and craft do have common element: struggle. Struggle with craft is about solving knotty problems in design, prototypes and supply chains. Collaboration, like competition, brings struggle with other people, in negotiation, compromise and prioritization. It is a contentious process. The 21st Century media industry is accelerating, but is yet in early days. Perhaps competition may hold primacy in our thinking about economic struggle, but collaboration is extending its influence.

Speakers

Michael Curtin
Jinhee Choi
Kristian Feigelson
Fu Syou-Ling
Nobuko Kawashima
Aynne Kokas
Lin Wenchi
Paul McDonald
Kevin Sanson
Shi Chuan
Winnie Tsang


Programme

#2 Master Class

A Master Class with Professor Michael Curtin Media Industries for Beginners: Tutorial and Discussion

2018

May 2

In conjunction with a colloquium Media Industries in Global Frames: Craft, Collaboration and Competition (May 3-4, 2018) at Lingnan University, Hong Kong, we seek graduate students to enroll in a Master Class to share their research. This is a rare chance to meet a senior media industry scholar, Prof. Michael Curtin, and pitch a short digest to him, and to other young scholars. We invite people from universities with doctoral programs in Media studies, Film studies, Cultural studies, and related areas. It is a chance to meet up with like-minded people, join a circle and carry your project to a wider audience, in Hong Kong and the world. In following days, the colloquium will meet to discuss an array of questions and issues, some of which may illuminate your research methods, and subject matter. We encourage those in the Master Class to attend, and contribute to the Media Industries colloquium on 3-4 May.

Class size: 10-12 participants Time and Date: 2-5 p.m., May 2, 2018

Competition, collaboration, and craft do have common element: struggle. Struggle with craft is about solving knotty problems in design, prototypes and supply chains. Collaboration, like competition, brings struggle with other people, in negotiation, compromise and prioritization. It is a contentious process. The 21st Century media industry is accelerating, but is yet in early days. Perhaps competition may hold primacy in our thinking about economic struggle, but collaboration is extending its influence.



Professor Michael Curtin University of California, Santa Barbara

Professor Curtin is the Duncan and Suzanne Mellichamp Professor of Film and Media Studies with affiliated appointments in Global Studies and East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies. He is director of the 21st Century Global Dynamics Initiative at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is co-founder and former co-director of the Media Industries Project of the Carsey-Wolf Center.

CProfessor Curtin is a leading scholar in media industry, media globalization, cultural geography, industry and policy studies, and creative labor. He has also held teaching or research appointments at Northwestern University, Renmin University, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the Institute of Ethnology at Academia Sinica, and the Center for the Humanities at Wesleyan University. His books include: Precarious Creativity: Global Media, Local Labor (University of California Press, 2016); Distribution Revolution: Conversations about the Digital Future of Film and Television (California, 2014), Reorienting Global Communication: Indian and Chinese Media Beyond Borders (University of Illinois Press, 2010), The American Television Industry (British Film Institute/Palgrave, 2009), and Playing to the World’s Biggest Audience: The Globalization of Chinese Film and TV (California, 2007). Curtin is currently at work on Media Capital: The Cultural Geography of Globalization and Voices of Labor in the Age of Global Media. He is co-editor of Media Industries, the Chinese Journal of Communication, and the British Film Institute’s International Screen Industries book series.




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