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CUS511 Topics in Cultural Institution and Policy 文化體制與政策專題

 

Course Title

:

Topics in Cultural Institution and Policy 文化體制與政策專題

Course Code

:

CUS511

No. of Credits/Term   

:

3

Mode of Tuition

:

Lecture

Class Contact Hours

:

3 hours per week

Category

:

Elective course

Discipline

:

Cultural Studies

Prerequisite(s)

:

Nil

Co-requisite(s)

:

Nil

Exclusion(s);    

:

Nil

Exemption Requirements

:

Nil

     
Brief Course Description
:

This elective course is the theoretical counterpart of the course “Workshop in Cultural Practices”. It examines how public policy on culture can be understood in the framework of Cultural Studies, and it focuses on the ways in which institutional factors affect the planning, development and management of culture in contemporary societies. Issues of citizenship and subjectivity will be discussed in the context of specific forms and processes of cultural governance.

     
Aims :
  1. To introduce students the basic concerns of Cultural Studies with issues relating to the shaping of public culture; that is, the institutional dimension of culture including social pedagogies and public policies on “culture” in the broad sense of the term;
  2. To familiarize students with the critical perspectives needed for understanding that cultural matters are significant social and public issues through in-depth study of a particular theme.
     
Learning Outcomes (LOs) :

Students will be able to

  1. LO1 : demonstrate an analysis of cultural studies concepts related to cultural institutions and policies;
  2. LO2 : ask meaningful questions in the area of cultural institution and policy with clear and precise formulation; 
  3. LO3: write alternative systems of thought in the area of cultural institution and policy, and recognize and assess, as need be, their assumptions, implications, and practical consequences.
     
Indicative Content :

Issues in the domain of cultural institution and policy will be selected and discussed. Specific contents based on different thematic foci vary year from year.

     
Teaching Method :

Lecture, seminar discussion, and students’ presentation.

     
Measurement of Learning Outcomes :

Scrutinizing students’ term papers and class presentation/discussion to examine whether students are able to

  1. demonstrate an understanding of the concepts related to the study of cultural institutions and policies, through the term project (50%); (LO1)
  2. demonstrate the ability to formulate and raise relevant and critical questions (with respect to the topics of the course) with clear and precise formulation, through class discussion and presentation (25% + 25%); (LO2)
  3. demonstrate an ability to articulate alternative views to existing discourses on the subject matters of the course, through term project (50%). (LO3)
     
Assessment :

100% continuous assessment, such as class participation (20%), group presentation (20%) and a term project (60%).
The group presentation ranges from 30 to 45 minutes. Term project : Of approximate length of 7,000 characters in Chinese or 5,000 words in English. If a particular student is keen on answering questions and expressing one's views, course teacher will give additional marks for that student.  
 
Criteria for group presentation assessment
•           Quality of Interpretation of the readings
•           The relevance of the case to the arguments raised
•           Organization of flow
•           Clarity of the presentation/ commentary 
•           Relevance of questions raised 
•           Response to classmates' questions

     

Assessment Rubrics

:

1) Class Participation (20%)

A, A-

B+, B, B-

C+, C, C-

F

Participates actively and constructively all the time.
Engages constructively with, all course material (assigned readings, issues, concepts).
Provides insightful analyses, raises critical points, and advances and deepens group discussion.
Consistently appreciates others’ contribution and engages with their
ideas sensitively.

Participates actively most of the time.
Demonstrates a good understanding
of, and engages constructively with course material.
Frequently provides helpful points or asks questions that advance and deepen group discussion.
Generally appreciates others’ contribution and engages with their ideas sensitively.

Participates most of the time but sometimes requires prompting.
Demonstrates a basic understanding of most of the course material and engages with it, though not always successfully. Sometimes makes positive contributions that advance group discussion.
Attempt to appreciate others’ contribution and to engage with their ideas sensitively, with some success.

Student does not attend tutorial. Or if student does attend, he or she demonstrates little or no understanding of course material, lacks engagement with it, or makes little or no effort to contribute to group discussion.
Little or no engagement / participation in group discussion even with prompting.
Shows no appreciation of others’ knowledge and skills.

 

2) Group Presentation (20%)

*Peer assessment will be conducted as a reference for assessment of one's contribution to the group presentation or project.

5%


A, A-

B+, B, B-

C+, C, C-

F

Excellent performance of teamwork. Demonstrates full communication with formal roles for each group member. Equal distribution of workload.

Good performance of teamwork. Demonstrates some communication with roles for each group member. Moderate distribution of workload.

Fair performance of teamwork. Demonstrates limited communication with informal roles for each group member. Some distribution of workload.

Poor performance of teamwork. Demonstrates no communication with unclear roles for each group member. Unequal distribution of workload.

15%


A, A-

B+, B, B-

C+, C, C-

F

Identifies and addresses clearly the main
question(s)
Examines the question /issue/ problem from all important perspectives. Overall logic is clear.
Presenter(s) engage the audience at all times.

Identifies and addresses most of the main question(s).
Examines the question/issue/ problem from most of the important perspectives but not all relevant arguments and counter arguments are fully examined.
Presenter(s) engage the audience most of the time.

Identifies and addresses most of the main question(s).
Examines the question/ issue/ problem from some of the important perspectives.
Presenter(s) engage the audience most of the
time

Lacks an understanding of what the question requires.
No critical engagement with issues, and themes. Presentation characterized by serious inaccuracies and misunderstandings.
Presenter(s) seem to make little attempt to
engage the audience

 

 

 

3) Term project (60%)

A, A-

B+, B, B-

C+, C, C-

F

Offers a vision expressed in a completely unique way.
Demonstrates critical thinking that challenges values or that transcends subject matter.
Reveals knowledge that is correct and consistent with purpose of project.

 

Offers a vision expressed in a unique way.
Demonstrates critical thinking.
Reveals knowledge that is mostly correct and consistent with purpose of project.

Expresses a clear perspective.
Attempts to reveal knowledge or provides partially correct knowledge that reflects purpose of project.

Expresses an unclear perspective.
Reflects a lack of knowledge consistent with purpose of project.

     
Important Notes :
  1. Students are expected to spend a total of 9 hours (i.e. 3* hours of class contact and 6* hours of personal study) per week to achieve the course learning outcomes.
  2. Students shall be aware of the University regulations about dishonest practice in course work, tests and examinations, and the possible consequences as stipulated in the Regulations Governing University Examinations. In particular, plagiarism, being a kind of dishonest practice, is “the presentation of another person’s work without proper acknowledgement of the source, including exact phrases, or summarised ideas, or even footnotes/citations, whether protected by copyright or not, as the student’s own work”. Students are required to strictly follow university regulations governing academic integrity and honesty.
  3. Students are required to submit writing assignment(s) using Turnitin.
  4. To enhance students’ understanding of plagiarism, a mini-course “Online Tutorial on Plagiarism Awareness” is available on https://pla.ln.edu.hk/.
     

Required Readings:
Varying from year to year

Recommended Readings:
Varying from year to year

Sample course content in the previous years includes

a. CUS511K Topics in Cultural Institution and Policy – Network Media and/as the Everyday

Our intense involvement with networked media in everyday life blurs boundaries between online, “virtual” space and offline space as well as boundaries between the public and the private. This Master-level course connects the socio-technical organization and reconfiguration of collective life and personhood to questions of power and politics. To this end, we analyze the technological mediation of cultural politics and governmentality by the everyday web. As we increasingly use the virtual expanse to define ourselves and relate to others, ways of managing and performing identities, social relations, and intimacies are changing. This course considers the technological mediation of different forms of relating to one another that might or might not be captured by notions of friendship to community, public, citizenry, and crowd. Furthermore, we learn about the technicalities of user-generated content platforms and features of the social web such as tags, likes, and reporting options, which are articulated to norms such as “crowd-sourcing,” “2.0” and “interactivity.” We connect these seemingly purely “technical” tools and norms to the cultural context of control, desire, morality, value, and commodification. Throughout the course, besides critical analysis, we try to re-imagine our relation to everyday technologies, as well as possible alternative web practices.

b. CUS511L Topics in Cultural Institution and Policy: Critical Urban Studies

As a result of continuous urbanization, the majority of the world's population today does not only live in cities, but in mega metropolitan city-regions of more than ten million inhabitants. This concentration of population in the 400 metropolitan city-regions in the world causes dramatic changes in the form and function of cities: in the ways the urban political economy is organized; in the cultural composition of the population; and in the very nature of urbanism as a way of life. These changes have stimulated new ways to understand the city and the urbanization process.

This is an introductory course on urban studies showcases how urban scholars analyze and interpret the restructuring of the metropolitan city-regions. Instead of simply describing the various functions of the city-regions, we will take a more critical perspective in analyzing the major problems of our urban life and urban problems in the context of globalization. After taking this course, students should be able to re-discover the hidden and marginalized voices in our fast-growing city-regions today.

c. CUS511U Topics in Cultural Institution and Policy: The Modern and the Postmodern

This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the advanced-level study of social and cultural theory. It takes an interdisciplinary approach by combining the theoretical resources drawn from both art criticisms and socio-historical studies. The students have to read key texts of selected contemporary social and cultural thinkers who have contributed to the ideas and theories of Modernity and Postmodernity. The students will learn not only to identify, compare and contrast the themes, features and styles of Modernism and Postmodernism in philosophy, as well as literary and artistic fields; they will also learn to explain their differences in terms of global social changes and historical transition at the institutional level. The students are also required to notice and reflect upon the relevance of these theories for the political and ethical issues we are facing nowadays.

d. CUS511S Topics in Cultural Institution and Policy : Colonialism and Post-colonialism

The course aims at providing the students with a critical understanding of the historical experience(s) of imperialism, colonialism and their aftermaths from the perspectives of cultural studies and post-colonial criticisms.  The focus is put on analyzing the effects of imperial rule or colonialism in terms of their institutional construction, knowledge formation, ideologies or other general cultural forms such as language, literature, media and art, etc. Students will be guided to make use of diverse analytical tools such as Marxism, post-colonialism, and feminism to examine the post-colonial conditions reflectively. The course will enhance the students to build up critical sensitivity of how imperialistic and colonial thoughts and practices are lingering on in today’s world and be able to evaluate different attempts to break away from the continuous influences of imperial and colonial legacies.