Department of Philosophy

Seminar

By

Dr. Goran Švob

University of Zagreb

" Frege and Wittgenstein on Identity "

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Date     : 10 October 2005 (Monday)

Time    : 4:30pm - 6:30pm

Venue  : GE321

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Abstract

Frege presented the problem of identity as a dilemma: do identities relate signs, or do they express a relation between things? Wittgenstein in Tractatus rejected the idea of identity  as a 'real relation' between every object and itself as nonsensical and even banned the identity sign from his logical notation. Later he showed a more relaxed attitude towards various uses of this notion, but still considered propositions like 'Every object is identical with itself' as highly suspicious. Yet, it is just this view of identity as an 'objective' or 'inner' relation, between each and every object and itself, that looms large in contemporary discussions and serves as a technical and unproblematic term in developing heavy metaphysical theses. Contrary to such tendencies of taking identity statements as immediate linguistic correlates of an extralinguistic reality, the early Frege's hints and Wittgenstein's later analysis both show possibilities of viewing identity as being closely tied up to language and knowledge, to human practices of naming, identification and recognition.

 

Dr. Goran Švob

Since graduating philosophy and English language and literature at the University of Zagreb (Croatia) in 1971, Goran Švob has been continuously attached to the Department of Philosophy at the University of Zagreb. In the academic year 73/74 specialisation in logic at the University of Oxford. In 1988. Ph.D. at the University of Zagreb. Published a series of articles on logic and philosophy of language in philosophical journals and a book on Frege's logic Frege: Conceptual Notation (in Croatian). Fields of study: philosophy of Frege, Russell and Wittgenstein, symbolic logic, philosophy of language and mathematics. Special interest in Far Eastern languages (Chinese and Japanese).

 

 

All are welcome

For enquiries, please call 2616 7488 or e-mail to dphilo@ln.edu.hk

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