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Joint Research Workshop and Webinar Series on China and India Studies

Topic: Bouncing back from COVID-19: Comparative Perspectives from China and India

 

 

Joint Research Workshop and Webinar Series on China and India Studies - Poverty

 

 

Introduction

 

Lingnan University and Flame University are jointly organizing Research Workshops and a Webinar Series on China and India Studies titled Bouncing back from COVID-19: Comparative perspectives from China and India in 2021. The series taps into the topical nature of China and India relations as well as the experiences of the two countries in managing the COVID-19 pandemic. The workshop and seminar series have four themes relating to Post-COVID Geopolitics, Economic, Education, Poverty, and Environment Policy. The workshops will serve as a brainstorming platform for scholars at Flame University and Lingnan University to provide insights and formulate agenda for research collaborations.

 

 

 

Theme: Poverty

 

Date: 20 April 2021 (Tuesday)
Time: 14:30 -16:00
Online Registration: https://lingnan.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0x19NW71jHeQajj

 

* A webinar link will be provided before each seminar.

 

 

 

Topic: Towards a better understanding of the stigma attached to welfare schemes targeting Hong Kong older adults

 

This study examines personal stigma, stigmatization by the public, and claims stigma attached to old-age Comprehensive Social Security Assistance (old-age CSSA), higher and normal Old Age Living Allowance (OALA) to determine their unique contribution to non-take-up of targeted income support among Hong Kong older adults. We used bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression based on a sample of 3,299 Hong Kong older adults to first quantify non-take-up of old-age CSSA and higher and normal OALA and then, second, to identify the correlates of non-take-up of these targeted income support schemes. Between 11%-14% of eligible participants failed to apply for benefits from old-age CSSA, normal and higher OALA, respectively. Old-age CSSA is more stigmatized than higher OALA and normal OALA. Transaction costs were most strongly related to non-take-up alongside the perceived insufficiency of benefits, difficulties in the application procedure, and difficulties in searching for program information. Non-take-up of old-age CSSA and higher OALA, but not normal OALA, significantly varied with welfare stigma after controlling for personal, household, and program characteristics. Our findings suggest that a review of application rules, asset and income thresholds, and benefit amounts may increase take-up of old-age CSSA and higher and normal OALA via reduction of transaction costs. Automatic enrolment proved effective in reducing information costs and is linked to high take-up of higher OALA. To reduce claim stigma among benefit recipients, the Hong Kong government may focus on retraining eligibility case workers and delinking old-age CSSA from its broader welfare policy.

 

 

Speaker:

 

Professor Stefan Kühner

 

Professor Stefan Kühner

Associate Professor,

Department of Sociology & Social Policy,

Lingnan University,

Hong Kong

 

Topic: Creating an enabling environment for early childhood development in Hong Kong

 

This study aims to investigate the mediating roles of parental investment and parental distress in the link between poverty and children’s cognitive development (including attention and executive functioning, language (Cantonese and English), memory and learning, and visuospatial processing). The analysis is based on a cross-sectional study derived from 167 preschool children (aged 36 to 47 months) who have completed neurocognitive assessment with their parent questionnaire in the 2019/2020 academic year. Empirical evidence supports that parental time investment and quality child-parent interactions generate stronger effects than household income on early child cognitive development. It is therefore crucial for parents to build up a good relationship and maintain quality interactions with their children, which is believed to create positive impacts on children’s early cognitive development and social behaviour. The findings from this research inform policies in relation to the advocacy of maximum working hours, flexible work-life balance arrangements, quality parenting, accessibility of childcare services enabling parents to engage in learning-related activities with their children. 

 

 

Speaker:

 

Professor Maggie Lau

 

Professor Maggie Lau

Research Associate Professor,

School of Graduate Studies and the Institute of Policy Studies,

Lingnan University,

Hong Kong

 

Topic: Food and nutritional security of Unorganized sector migrants during COVID-19 lockdown in India

 

The sudden nationwide complete lockdown announced on March 24 2020 in India, and its three extensions had a devastating effect on the livelihoods of millions of migrant workers in the informal sector in India. The migrants experienced severe distress due to loss of employment, lack of disposable income, lack of social security, and the resulting food insecurity, hunger, anxiety, and depression. Professor Shivakumar Jolad will discuss the results from our primary survey of migrant workers in Pune city India conducted from May- July 2020. The talk will deliberate on the social-economic distress characterised by the loss of livelihood and lack of savings and social security and its impact on the food and nutritional security of migrant workers and their families. Professor Shivakumar Jolad will highlight the challenges in accessing food subsidy by migrants, the inadequacy of aid and government response in addressing the crisis. Long term implications of the migrant crisis on poverty, hunger, and health will also be discussed. Finally, recommendations to avert a food security crisis will be discussed.

 

 

Speaker:

 

Professor Shivakumar Jolad

 

Professor Shivakumar Jolad

Associate Professor from Public Policy,

FLAME University,

India