The Liberal Art University in Hong Kong

English for Communication II (LCE1020)

Class contact hours in Term 2 : 4 (2 x 2 hour tutorials) Credits: 3

Important Notes

  • Completion of LCE1010 is a prerequisite of taking LCE1020.
  • Completion of LCE1010 and LCE1020 is the prerequisite of taking LCE2010.
  • It is recommended that students who fail LCE1010 and/or LCE1020 should retake the course(s) in the 2nd year of their study and they should not drop the required courses of LCE1010, LCE1020 and LCE2010 except for students who are granted credit transfer/course exemption.
  • Completion of LCE1010, LCE1020 and LCE2010 is the prerequisite of taking any of the English free-elective courses offered by CEAL, except for LCE303. [Exchange students, either for one term or one year, will be exempted from this requirement. However, if these exchange students are taking LCE1010, LCE1020 or LCE2010, they will not be allowed to take any English electives offered by CEAL.]
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Course Introduction

Welcome to LCE1020 English for Communication II. We hope that you will find this course interesting, stimulating and useful for your academic studies at Lingnan and for your future professional development. Before you begin this course, there is some important information for you below which your instructor will go through with you. If you have any questions about the course, your instructor will be happy to answer them.

LCE1020 English for Communication is a 3-credit English enhancement course in tutorial mode. There are four hours of tutorial classes per week (2 x 2 hours). Class size is about 20 and you will be encouraged to both actively participate in class and to study English outside class through self-directed language learning activities.

This course is the second of three courses to prepare you to participate in your liberal arts education at Lingnan by improving your communication skills in English. The follow-on course is LCE2010 English for Communication III, which will be offered in the first/second term of your second year.

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Aims

The aims of this course are to:

  • further consolidate and enhance your ability to gain knowledge and information through reading and listening to longer English texts;
  • further consolidate and enhance your ability to express your ideas, thoughts, opinions and knowledge through speaking and writing in English about a variety of topics;
  • prepare you for dealing effectively with your academic studies while at University;
  • equip you with the necessary English language skills for your immediate and future academic and professional development;
  • further raise your awareness of your own proficiency levels in the four skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) as well as in grammar and vocabulary;
  • provide practice of concepts, skills and techniques necessary for learning and improving your language skills independently in preparation for life-long language learning, and
  • help you to communicate in English with an increased ability to think logically and critically as part of the liberal arts education.
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Intended Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, you will be able to:

  • write an effective paragraph developing an argument with support from sources.
  • write a persuasive essay showing clearly their position on a controversial topic.
  • present orally data or information shown in a graph or chart.
  • identify and correct in their own and others’ work basic language errors related to a variety of grammar structures and functions.
  • read a variety of texts on a range of topics for gist, global meaning and a range of specific information such as opinions, numbers and expressions of quantity, and descriptions. 
  • listen to extended speech in a variety of contexts and on a range of topics for gist, global meaning and a range of specific information such as opinions, numbers and expressions of quantity, and descriptions.
  • make use of concepts, skills and techniques necessary for learning and improving their language skills independently in preparation for life-long language learning.

More specific and detailed Intended Learning Outcomes for each unit are shown below.

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Key Content

There are four units in this course:

Unit One: Self-directed language learning (II)
Unit Two: Using sources to support ideas
Unit Three: Writing effectively for academic purposes
Unit Four: Enhancing your presentation with data

The 4 teaching units of this course focus on developing language and study skills students are likely to need and use in their academic and future professional life. These include being able to:

  • communicate their ideas and opinions in clear and well organized writing;
  • give clear and well organized short descriptive presentations;
  • have an awareness of register and appropriacy in written and spoken communication;
  • comprehend and extract relevant information from longer written texts or extended speech on a variety of topics; and
  • develop the skills to continue to improve their language proficiency independently.
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Measurement of Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes will be measured through continuous assessments (60%) which will be administered throughout the course and a final examination (40%) during the examination period at end of term. Due to the integrated approach of the course, the assessments will focus on all four main language skills plus the self-directed language learning component as follows:

  • Writing coursework (1):  Read the provided article and write a paragraph of 200-250 words on the given topic in class. The paragraph should serve as a point to support your opinion on the given topic (12% of final mark).
  • Writing coursework (2):  Write an argumentative essay of 850-1000 words showing clearly your position on one of the given controversial topics (20% of final mark).
  • Speaking coursework:  Give an individual presentation of 3-5 minutes of some information and data presented in a graph or chart(17% of final mark)
  • • Final reading exam (multiple choice):  Selected reading texts to assess the reading learning outcomes introduced and practiced throughout the course (20% of final mark).
  • • Final listening exam (multiple choice):  Selected listening texts to assess the listening learning outcomes introduced and practiced throughout the course (20% of final mark).
  • Self-directed language learning: will be assessed by submission of a learning plan, learning evidence, and a self-assessment report (5% of final mark) and completion of six online listening and reading exercises (6% of final mark)
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Unit Intended Learning Outcomes and Teaching and Learning Activities

LCE1020 – Unit 1: Self-directed language learning (II)

What you will learn in this unit:

There are two parts in this unit:

(1) Self-directed language learning

(2) Self-access online reading and listening course

 

Self-directed language learning is an important component of CEAL’s 3 core courses. Last term you received training in developing a learning plan and explored some learning resources in the English Language Support Service (ELSS). In LCE1020, you will develop your learning plan and put it into action independently. .

 

The self-access online reading and listening course consists of six exercises. They will provide you with regular practice of essential reading and listening skills, and help you prepare for the final listening and reading examination. They will also provide practice to help prepare for tests such as IELTS and DELTA.

 

Before you start doing the first online exercise, make sure you read the following information available on Moodle LCE1020 Main Course Page:

  • Online Reading and Listening Course - Introduction (for students who did not take LCE1010 in Term One)
  • Online Reading and Listening Course - Technical Tips

Why this is useful for you:

At University

Self-directed study is extremely important at university. Using feedback from your assessments, instructors, and peers, you can identify weak areas in your knowledge. You can make improving this weakness your goal and make a plan to reach your goal by self-directed language learning, making the best use of your time and the resources available to you. Learners who are aware of their weaknesses and work on their own to strengthen them are more successful than other less independent learners.

 

In the Workplace

Being able to set goals, plan, and work independently towards a goal and to a deadline are all essential skills in the workplace. Employers like staff who can work autonomously without the need for constant supervision. Taking responsibility for your work and carrying it out independently are good qualities to have in the workplace.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

By the end of this unit, you will be able to:

  • identify a learning goal that addresses your needs or interests
  • use relevant learning materials, resources, and activities to achieve a learning goal
  • present self-directed learning clearly with some learning evidence
  • work independently towards a goal and to a deadline

 

Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs):

In this unit, you will:

  • read some example learning evidence from students
  • evaluate some example learning evidence from students based on a checklist
  • carry out an individualised Learning Plan which seeks to address an identified learning need

 

LCE1020 - Unit 2 : Using sources to support your ideas

What you will learn in this unit:

In this unit, you will learn how to incorporate quotations and paraphrases into a paragraph from sources and acknowledge these sources of information. The writing practices throughout the unit will help you improve your writing accuracy using correct grammar and sentence structures. All these skills will prepare you for Unit 3 in which you will learn how to write an argumentative essay presenting your views on a controversial topic.

 

You will also do some reading and listening, and practice understanding of the writer’s and speaker’s opinions on various topics. These listening and reading skills may be amongst those tested in the final listening and reading exams.

 

Why this is useful for you:

At university, you are expected to think critically and to express your ideas clearly in a well-structured and concise format. Developing an argument has been considered essential to help develop your critical thinking. At the same time, you will gradually develop academic integrity by acknowledging all sources used in the writing, which is highly valued by both academic and professional communities.

 

The ability to write an argumentative essay will also be useful when it comes to writing task 2of the IELTS test where you will be expected to write 250 words expressing your opinion on a topic. This task will look at how you structure an essay and the paragraphs within the essay. It will examine how you structure your argument using each paragraph to present a separate segment of your argument.

 

Other skills will also be covered in the unit which will be beneficial towards the IELTS test including:

1. Listening skills

2. Speaking skills aimed primarily at Parts 2 and 3 of the speaking test

3. Reading skills, in particular looking for specific information

 

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

By the end of this unit, you will be able to:

  • incorporate quotations and paraphrases into a paragraph from sources
  • acknowledge sources of information properly
  • improve writing accuracy using correct grammar and sentence structures

 

Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs):

In this unit, you will:

  • practice understanding of the writer’s and speaker’s opinions on various topics
  • express views on some controversial issues
  • learn how to write an effective topic sentence
  • learn how to use quotations and paraphrases with proper in-text citation
  • learn how to incorporate sources into essay
  • write paragraphs using the skills and language introduced and practiced in the unit

 

LCE1020 - Unit 3: Writing effectively for academic purposes

What you will learn in this unit:

In this unit, you will learn how to write an argumentative essay following some academic writing conventions. A brief introduction of different types of academic writing, the structure of an argumentative essay, counter-argument and refutation, and some conventions of academic writing (for example, hedging) will be covered. Also, you will learn how to present your ideas using tone and register appropriate for academic writing. The writing practices throughout the unit will help you improve your writing accuracy using correct grammar and sentence structures.

 

You will also do some reading and listening and practice understanding of the writer’s and speaker’s opinions on various topics. These listening and reading skills may be amongst those tested in the final listening and reading exams.

 

Why this is useful for you:

At university, you are expected to think critically and to express your ideas clearly in a well-structured and concise format. Skills in argumentation are a form of critical-thinking skills, and argumentative writing is essential to help develop students’ overall critical thinking. By learning how to write an argumentative essay, you will also develop the proper tone, technique, and style for academic writing, which is a common form of assessment in many disciplines at university. At the same time, you will gradually develop academic integrity, which is highly valued by both academic and professional communities.

 

The following skills covered in the unit will help prepare you specifically for the Academic Writing Task 2 of IELTS:

1. essay structure of argumentative writing

2. thesis writing

3. main and supporting sentences

4. cohesion and coherence

5. tone, register, and other conventions of academic writing

 

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

By the end of this unit, you will be able to:

  • identify credible written sources
  • write an effective introduction, body paragraphs and a conclusion
  • write a counter-argument and refutation
  • use tone and register appropriate for academic writing
  • make a reference list in APA referencing style
  • improve writing accuracy using correct grammar and sentence structures

 

Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs):

In this unit, you will:

  • practice understanding of the writer’s and speaker’s opinions on various topics
  • learn the nature and requirements of argumentative writing
  • express views on some controversial issues in writing
  • learn how to evaluate source materials
  • learn how to organize an academic essay
  • practice writing the introduction, a body paragraph and the conclusion
  • give feedback to each other on the introductory, body and concluding paragraphs
  • learn how to deal with counter-arguments and refute them
  • learn how to write with suitable tone and register
  • identify some common language errors in students’ academic writing
  • learn how to make a reference list

 

LCE1020 - Unit 4: Enhancing your presentation with data

What you will learn in this unit:

This unit focuses on oral presentation of data and information. You will learn a number of skills, including: understanding graphs; giving an introduction which clearly lays out the purpose and outline of the talk; preparing a conclusion that rounds off the talk; and creating a well-structured body. You will also learn some delivery skills to make your talk more effective, some of which will be revisited and developed more fully in the follow-on course LCE2010.

 

The unit also covers some useful expressions that you can use not only for the different parts of a presentation but also for describing quantity, describing trends, and making comparisons. The speaking practices throughout the unit will help you improve your speaking fluency and develop confidence in public speaking.

 

You will also do some reading and listening and practice comprehension of specific details such as statistics and survey findings. These listening and reading skills may be amongst those tested in the final listening and reading exams.

 

Why this is useful for you:

Firstly, at university, you have a lot of opportunities to present ideas in order to show your knowledge of a particular subject. Effective oral presentation skills are a sign of professionalism and are a key competency of university graduates.

 

Secondly, being able to understand and describe graphic information or data is an important academic skill in many disciplines. The language for presenting data and information covered in this unit will also help you prepare for the Academic Writing Task 1 of IELTS in which you need to describe graphic information clearly and accurately. The task tests your ability to select and report the main features, describe and compare data, identify significance and trends in the information provided.

 

The following skills covered in the unit will help prepare you specifically for the Academic Writing Task 1 of IELTS:

1. describing quantity

2. comparing data

3. describing trends and changes over time

4. using correct tenses and prepositions to describe data

 

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

By the end of this unit, you will be able to:

  • understand graphs and charts
  • organize a data presentation effectively
  • use appropriate delivery skills to make a talk
  • use appropriate expressions for oral presentation
  • use appropriate expressions to describe quantity and trends, and make comparison
  • improve speaking fluency and develop confidence in public speaking

 

Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs):

In this unit, you will:

  • practice comprehension of specific details in spoken and written texts such as statistics and survey findings
  • learn how to make data and information interesting for audience
  • learn how to use appropriate expressions for data presentation
  • study and practice verb tenses used for presenting data
  • learn how to paraphrase graph titles
  • learn how to structure an oral presentation using appropriate expressions
  • practice using some delivery skills such as the use of voice and eye contact
  • practice presenting data shown on PowerPoint slides
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Course Guidelines

Homework

You will be given homework to do, there are writing and speaking coursework assignments to complete throughout the course and the Self-directed Language Learning Unit also provides work for you to complete throughout the term.

Attendance

Generally, illness is the only reason to miss classes. Other cases should have your instructor’s prior approval. In case of illness preventing attendance at classes, students must present a doctor’s letter or other acceptable documentary evidence. Every student is expected to attend a minimum 80% of classes, even taking illness and approved absences into account. Students are also expected to be punctual in attending all classes and consultations. Late coming will be noted and lateness of more than 15 minutes will result in your being marked absent from that hour of the class. An unsatisfactory attendance or habitual lateness is likely to result in failure of the course. It is not the responsibility of your instructor to remind you about your attendance and/or to warn you if your attendance is low. It is your own responsibility.

If students miss a consultation scheduled with their teacher or an in-class assessment, they will be counted absent for the whole lesson (i.e. 2 hours).

Assessment Policy

Any student who fails to be present at an in-class assessment because of illness will be given one further opportunity for assessment, provided there is sufficient documentary evidence justifying his/her absence and it is administratively possible. Only in cases approved by the class instructor, will students be allowed to take a make-up assessment.

Students who disagree with the awarded grade for any assessment should meet with their instructor and appeal within 5 days after receiving the disputed grade. Appeals made after this time are not likely to be considered. When making an appeal, justification for a change of mark should be presented.

Late Submission Penalties

For each assessment, there are deadlines. Five per cent (5%) of the total possible mark will be deducted for submission each day (including public holidays) after the due date. This penalty applies to all work that is not submitted on the due date without prior approval and/or failure to produce supporting documentary evidence such as a doctor’s certificate in the case of illness.

Presentation of Work

At the beginning of each unit of this course, there is a task sheet which describes the main task to be carried out in the unit. Pay close attention to the instructions in the task sheet that tell you how to present and submit your work. Your work will be done in class or submitted through Moodle.

Plagiarism

If plagiarism is demonstrated, the student concerned may receive a zero mark on that assignment and dishonest practice cases may be referred to the Student Disciplinary Committee. If students have any doubts about a piece of submitted work, they should discuss the work with their instructor before officially submitting it.

To understand more about plagiarism – what it is and how to avoid it – students are advised to read the following information on the University’s intranet:
http://www.ln.edu.hk/info-for/students/orientation/academic-integrity

Problems with your Studies

To be successful at University, you must learn to communicate effectively with your instructors. Your CEAL Instructor for this course is not only there to teach you in the classroom during your tutorials, they are also there to help, guide and support you in your studies. If you have any questions or problems regarding your LCE course or any other aspect of your life or studies at Lingnan, do not hesitate to tell your Instructor. Your Instructor should provide their contact details such as their office room number, telephone number and email address. You can also find the contact details of all CEAL staff here: http://www.ln.edu.hk/ceal/staff/index.php. CEAL Instructors have a certain number of Office Hours each week for student consultation. That time is intended for you to meet your Instructors, so make good use of it. The sooner you communicate any difficulties you are having, the more help your Instructor and the University will be able to give you.

Important Notes:

  1. Students are expected to spend a total of 12 hours (i.e. 4 hours of class contact and 8 hours of personal study) per week to achieve the course learning outcomes.
  2. Students shall be aware of the University regulations about dishonest practice in course work, tests and examinations, and the possible consequences as stipulated in the Regulations Governing University Examinations. In particular, plagiarism, being a kind of dishonest practice, is “the presentation of another person’s work without proper acknowledgement of the source, including exact phrases, or summarised ideas, or even footnotes/citations, whether protected by copyright or not, as the student’s own work”. Students are required to strictly follow university regulations governing academic integrity and honesty.
  3. Students are required to submit writing assignment(s) using Turnitin.
  4. To enhance students’ understanding of plagiarism, a mini-course “Online Tutorial on Plagiarism Awareness” is available on https://pla.ln.edu.hk/.

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